John Krasinski Takes on Sci-Fi Film ‘Life on Mars’ As His Next!!

Well that was quick. Fresh off the smashing success of his horror thriller A Quiet Place, John Krasinski has solidified his next project—and it’s not a Quiet Place sequel. THR reports that Krasinski is reteaming with his Quiet Place producers Michael Bay, Brad Fuller, and Andrew Form on the sci-fi thriller Life on Mars, which he intends to direct. Paramount Pictures, which distributed Krasinski’s horror film, is in negotiations to distribute Life on Mars as well, bringing this whole team back together.

Life on Mars is based on a short story by Cecil Castellucci called We Have Always Lived on Mars, which follows a woman who is one of the few descendants of a human colony on Mars that was abandoned by Earth. She is surprised to discover that she can breathe the Martian atmosphere, and while the crew takes this to mean their terraforming has finally paid off, this development actually unlocks the mystery of the disaster that stranded her and her team on the planet in the first place.

Krasinski apparently found the story and brought it to Platinum Dunes himself. Right now there are no plans for Krasinski to star and there’s no writer attached, but Krasinski’s pass on the Quiet Place script was substantial and is a major reason the film turned out to be as emotional as it was, so if Krasinski decides to write Life on Mars himself there would be no complaints from me.

The Office breakout made his directorial debut on the 2005 indie Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, then helmed the sweet 2016 family dramedy The Hollars, but A Quiet Place marked a massively ambitious departure in terms of tone for the filmmaker, and it paid off tremendously. Given the film’s critical and commercial success many were curious to see what Krasinski would direct next—no doubt he’s been flooded with offers, and plenty of filmmakers a this stage make the jump to a superhero or Star Wars movie. But I have to say it’s nice to see, for now at least, Krasinski is keen on sticking to relatively original material.

 

via Collider

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